Queensland couple hope to be among those cryogenically frozen at Australia-first facility

Queensland couple hope to be among those cryogenically frozen at Australia-first facility
  • PublishedOctober 6, 2023

‘A lot of people are happy with one life and then they quit. We want to keep it going.’

Barbara and Allan Pease have spent most of their lives together.

So when the Queensland couple is cryogenically frozen, it might come as no surprise they’re doing it “side by side”.

“We think it’s quite exciting we’re going to be frozen in time together,” Allan Pease told 7NEWS.

“We’ve spent most of our lives together, climbing mountains and doing exciting things. The ups and downs that happen with an exciting life, we’re going to get more of it.

“We’re going to go in together, side by side.”

The couple, who live on the Sunshine Coast, even have an agreement that if one of them “doesn’t unfreeze properly”, the cryogenicists will “pull the plug on the other”, Pease said.

The Peases want to become among the first people frozen at a newly-built facility in the NSW town of Holbrook — the first such facility in the Southern Hemisphere — operated by Southern Cryonics.

They first became interested in cryogenics while having their youngest children.

With Barbara in her 40s and Allan undergoing radiation treatment to his prostate, they were unable to conceive naturally.

So, using DNA as opposed to sperm, they were able to produce two embryos.

“One was born, who’s now our 18-year-old son,” Allan said.

“The other was put into cryo-suspension for two years, which they’d been doing for IVF for quite a few years.

“She’s now our almost-16, perfectly healthy daughter.”

What’s clear in listening to Pease is that he believes strongly in the technology.

He claims the technology to cryogenically freeze a person has been “pretty much perfected”, but is “not there yet for unfreezing and coming back” — and may not be for another 50 years.

Allan Pease has spoken of his desire to be cryogenically frozen.
Allan Pease has spoken of his desire to be cryogenically frozen. Credit: 7NEWS

“You’ve got to be optimistic about the science, that they’ll come up with the technology,” he said.

“We know they will.

“This technology is definitely coming, and it’s very close right now.”

If things don’t work out as he hopes, “we’re heading for blackness anyway, so what’s the difference?”, he says.

And the payoff, if it is successful, is too significant.

Southern Cryonics has built a facility in NSW to house cryogenically frozen humans.
Southern Cryonics has built a facility in NSW to house cryogenically frozen humans. Credit: Facebook

“You’ve got to love your life and want more. Barbara and I, we love life. We want more and more,” he said.

“A lot of people are happy with one life and then they quit. We want to keep it going.”

Southern Cryonics boss Peter Tsolakides says the process to freeze someone starts “after legal death”.

The body is slowly brought to -75C before being stored in a flask full of liquid nitrogen.

“Then really the only activity that’s required is to keep topping up the liquid nitrogen,” Tsolakides said.

SOURCE: 7NEWS

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