‘Make this man PM’: Education minister goes viral for his refreshing take on the Voice to Parliament

‘Make this man PM’: Education minister goes viral for his refreshing take on the Voice to Parliament
  • PublishedSeptember 20, 2023

In all the noise about the Indigenous Voice to Parliament, it can be hard to find a fresh take that makes you listen; but it seems federal Education Minister Jason Clare has done just that.

Mr Clare has gone viral for a rousing speech that urged Australians to vote Yes in the referendum for “a fair go”.

The Labor frontbencher shared footage of the speech, delivered at a press conference on the Gold Coast to launch the Yes campaign on August 31, to his X/Twitter account with the caption: “let’s do this Australia”.

In the speech, he pointed to the eclectic group around him – which included Indigenous Affairs Minister Linda Burney and Labor Senator Murray Watt – saying they gathered to support the Voice because “we all share one thing in common”.

“We believe in our heart of hearts about fairness,” Mr Clare said.

“You know, if you tap the veins of the average Aussie … you’ll find one thing, and that’s just a genuine belief in the importance of fairness.”

He said, “We talk about in the pub, we fight about it in Parliament, it’s in the title of our national anthem.”

“We want a fair go for all Aussies. And ultimately that’s what this [referendum] comes down to.”

The edited package was spliced together with sweeping music and shots of the Uluru Statement from the Heart, as well as clips of thrilling sporting moments, and the crowds wrapped in green and gold cheering team on.

Indigenous Voice to parliament

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The Voice referendum question

A Proposed Law: to alter the Constitution to recognise the First Peoples of Australia by establishing an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice. Do you approve of this proposed alteration?


If a majority of Australians vote in favour of the Voice, the Constitution would be amended as follows: 

  • There shall be a body, to be called the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice;
  • The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice may make representations to the Parliament and the Executive Government of the Commonwealth on matters relating to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples;
  • The Parliament shall, subject to this Constitution, have power to make laws with respect to matters relating to the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Voice, including its composition, functions powers and procedures.

Mr Clare continued: “I think most Aussies will say it’s fair enough that we, in our founding document, in our first document, recognise our First Australians.”

“The fact that there were people there before Captain Cook arrived, before my ancestors arrived, we should say that in our Constitution. That’s just a fact.”

He said the vote was a practical decision to effectively address the hardships Indigenous Australians go through.

“We know that there are a lot of Indigenous Australians doing it tough,” he said.

“And we want to make sure that our taxpayers’ money is spent on the things that are going to work; whether it’s in health, or education, or jobs, or housing. And it’s not at the moment, that’s just a fact, too.”

The Voice to Parliament came from the Uluru Statement from the Heart, signed by Indigenous Australians from across the country. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Martin Ollman

The Voice to Parliament came from the Uluru Statement from the Heart, signed by Indigenous Australians from across the country. Picture: NCA NewsWire / Martin Ollman

Mr Clare repeated the Voice is not an idea from politicians, but a request from Indigenous people across the country.

“And they’re just saying listen. Listen to us. Set up an advisory committee and pick our brains about the things that will help to make us healthier, give us a better education, a better chance at a job, what we all want for our own families: a better life.”

He said politicians have “failed” to address the hardships that Indigenous people for decades – saying the “decades of good intentions, billions of dollars spent … hasn’t worked”.

“And voting No just means that things will continue not to work,” he warned.

Thousands of people marched in a “Walk for Yes” rally held in Melbourne at the weekend. Picture: William Weat / AFP.

Thousands of people marched in a “Walk for Yes” rally held in Melbourne at the weekend. Picture: William Weat / AFP.

Mr Clare concluded – as a collection of images of Yes demonstrations around the country played in the background – that the October 14 referendum was opportunity unlike any other for Australians.

“Not every generation of Australians gets the chance to make history. We do,” he said.

“We get a chance this year … to put our history in our Constitution, to recognise the fact that Indigenous Australians have been here for 60,000 years, and to come together to do something good and make this a better country and a fairer country.

“To do what we say when we sing the national anthem here and around the country: to Advance Australia Fair.”

The video was shared as the debate over the Voice reaches a fever pitch, with toxic bombs being thrown across Yes and No battle lines.

Demonstrations have been held across Australia both in support and opposition to the Indigenous Voice to Parliament, as the race to the October 14 referendum heats up. Picture: Andrew Leeson / AFP).

Demonstrations have been held across Australia both in support and opposition to the Indigenous Voice to Parliament, as the race to the October 14 referendum heats up. Picture: Andrew Leeson / AFP).

Indigenous Affairs minister Linda Burney and her Opposition counterpart Jacinta Nampijinpa Price have called out the “racist” abuse they have been subjected to throughout the referendum campaign.

Senator Price said she had been subjected to “revolting” messages and abuse after her phone number was leaked online.

Shortly after, Ms Burney was heard on a hot mic calling out the “unbelievably racist” attacks she had been subjected to in recent months. She released a statement after saying her office, social media and email accounts had been inundated with racist abuse.

The week after the women called out poor behaviour, Yes supporters have hurled vile language at No campaigners during an event against the referendum in South Australia.

But Mr Clare’s video has resonated with Aussies online, with many heaping praise on the education minister for the “powerful and heartfelt message” with “real cut through”.

“Oh Jason, you made me cry. Beautifully said,” one replied on X/Twitter.

“Great speech, talking to people in easy to understand manner,” another wrote.

“Damn you speak so well Jason. Brilliantly said,” another wrote.

“Thank you [ …] Spoken from the heart! Plain and simple!”

The praise continued on an earlier version of the video posted to Mr Clare’s Instagram page, filling the comment section with emoji applause.

“Well said. I’m with you. Yes. Yes. Yes,” another wrote.

And among the digital applause, one suggestion kept popping up: “make this man PM”.

One user said Mr Clare was “the only reason he voted for Labor”.

“Think he’s a future PM,” another woman wrote in X/Twitter.

“This is what leadership looks like,” another user wrote. “Make this man PM!”

SOURCE: NEWS.COM

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